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Amy and Rachael’s Volunteer Report

Monday, 8 November, 2010

Summer 2010 volunteer placement with the Santa Rosa Fund in Colegio Público Santa Rosa, Managua, Nicaragua – Summary Report.  Two volunteers, Amy Haworth Johns and Rachael Wright, running the Computer Workshop July – September 2010.

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Ken Sue Santa Rosa Computer Report 2

Wednesday, 21 October, 2009

Sue and Ken Martin from Somerset, long-time supporters of the Santa Rosa Fund, spent July and August this year training members of staff at the school in Managua in use of the computers which were provided to the school in 2006 by the British Embassy in Costa Rica and by the Santa Rosa Fund. The following is their report of some aspects of their work.

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Alistair Williams 2007 -Teaching Computer Skills at the Santa Rosa School Nicaragua

Monday, 1 October, 2007

Despite a number of problems, our short computer course in the Santa Rosa School was remarkably successful. The project aimed to provide very basic computer literacy for a small number of teachers at the school, to enable them to use the machines already donated, and in turn to pass their skills on to others. The program mainly focused on the use of Microsoft Word, in an attempt to teach basic word processing and keyboard skills. We also introduced other basic programs such as Paint, and Solitaire to improve their use of the mouse. Because the program was one on one, it enabled us to tailor the each lesson to suit the student, which meant the more able students were able to learn other useful skills, such as file and folder management, and how to use a search engine on the Internet.

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Category: Volunteer Reports

James Watson 2007 – My experience of volunteering and its value

Monday, 1 October, 2007

Our trip to Nicaragua was a fascinating experience, and one which I personally, and I think all of us, enjoyed immensely, at the same time as learning a great deal. I feel like my horizons were expanded dramatically by being able to witness and be a part of supporting the people that we met over there. We were able to travel around quite a lot in Nicaragua and have introductions to numerous different struggles of different communities and groups. From the population of the tiny, isolated village of Los Positos trying to find resources to provide schooling to their children, to the Banana workers camped in Managua struggling for government recognition of their problems with carcinogenic agricultural chemicals. Meeting these people as part of the Santa Rosa Fund (and ENCA) and being able to offer real support gave a powerful feeling of connectedness to their struggles.

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Category: Volunteer Reports

Katie and Sarah Miles 2006

Thursday, 26 January, 2006

In the last issue of the SRF Newsletter, we briefly mentioned that Katie and Sarah Miles from Birmingham had been working with our partner organisation, the Berriz Missionary Centre, in the El Viejo area of Nicaragua. They were there as a result of contacting the Santa Rosa Fund, and their primary purpose was to conduct research into disaster preparedness and response. During their time there they faced a tornado, were stranded in a national bus strike, and witnessed first-hand disaster response to severe flooding caused by Hurricane Stan.

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Category: Volunteer Reports

Polly Wilding 2000 – A volunteer placement at the Santa Rosa School, Managua

Monday, 18 September, 2000

In March 2000, Polly Wilding from Worcester began part-time volunteer work for the Red de Mujeres Contra la Violencia (Network of Women Against Violence) in Managua, Nicaragua. She was there for six months and to make use of her free time she volunteered to teach English to a few teachers at the Santa Rosa School. On the 5th May she was introduced to the school by the SRF treasurer who happened to be in the region. Not too surprisingly, the school used her visit as an excuse to put on an ‘acto’ – an acto to welcome Polly. Here is her account of that first visit to the school and a couple of photos from the day.

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Category: Volunteer Reports

Tanya Rodriguez 1999 – A report on her volunteer work in Nicaragua

Saturday, 18 September, 1999

A month after Hurricane Mitch the Santa Rosa Fund’s first volunteer placement, Tanya Rodriguez from Bristol, flew into Managua for a spell of three months in the country, some of it spent at the Escuela Ernesto Ché Guevara teaching English to a few of the teachers. This is her report.

Escuela Ernesto Ché Guevara

I found Escuela Ernesto Ché Guevara looking very proud. A crowd of beautiful 5-6 year old children were graduating from their ‘pre-escolar’ education. The school playground was decorated with bunches of balloons. Arriving late, I expected to slip into the back-row unnoticed, but I heard an announcement concerning “Guests from the Republic of England” and was escorted in a state of shock onto the stage where several important looking people were sitting. I wanted to laugh and cry simultaneously. Facing me on one side was an audience in miniature: a fragile, demure and terribly smart crowd of 5-6 year olds, all in full-length burgundy graduation cloaks and matching tassled hats. They seemed awed by their own uniforms. On the other side, proud Mums and Dads. And there too were the press. Maybe my tearfulness arose from the innocence these children exuded, or the immense earnestness of the whole atmosphere of the event, and my laughter because there seemed something ridiculous to be dropped, green, straight out of England into this sort of honoured position at the centre of it. Each child was assisted onto the stage by a boy in a soldier’s uniform, each child treading on their cloak and seeming too frail for the big steps and big clothes, and with a serious and awe-struck expression, to receive their award. I imagined that from their eyes, such an event would communicate to them that their own personal education is such an important thing, not just for them, but to their parents, teachers and even outsiders that they don’t know, which to them may represent the world in general.

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Category: Volunteer Reports

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